Mark Kielkucki maintains a studio at the Hobbs Building in Kansas City and is a member of the Kansas City Artists Coalition

 

Selected paintings can be viewed at the Sav-Art gallery in Kansas City and the Strecker-Nelson gallery in Manhatten, KS.

 

Any painting with an * indicates addtional shipping charges due to size.

Contact: kielkucki@hotmail.com for inquiries about paintings

 

Mark Kielkucki

Bio and Statement for Mark Kielkucki

Mark Kielkucki is an artist who works with acrylic paints on watercolor paper and canvas. His art has taken him around the world painting; from Kansas City, New Orleans and Portland, Oregon to Greece, Morocco, Mexico and Montreal, Canada. Mark produces highly original, color saturated works of art. His latest paintings, as one reviewer described them, embody a style that lands “somewhere between David Lynch and Tim Burton.”

The creative spirit of Mark Kielkucki has led him beyond the confines of the visual arts into satirical writing. With his creation of his infamous alter ego, YogaDawg Howls, Mark satirizes the contemporary yoga scene in a humorous light making him a “yogalebrity” within the insular yoga world. When Mark is not painting or writing satire, he can be found gaining inspiration in various jazz clubs around the city. He
maintains a studio at the Hobbs Building in Kansas City and is a member of the Kansas City Artists Coalition. He is represented by the Sav-Art gallery in Kansas City and the Strecker-Nelson gallery in Manhatten, KS. Mark graduated from the Kansas City Art Institute and lives in historic Columbus Park in downtown Kansas City.

“Even though I am working with a fair amount of ambiguity with the placement of elements within the painting, there is a sense that a story is being told and a new narrative created. By placing a combination of disparate objects in ambiguous or dubious situations while presenting them within an easily understood visual platform, the paintings allows the viewer to easily conclude their own personal understanding of the painting without being hindered by factually correct reality, connotations or conceptual baggage. Even though the individual images are based in the real world, by posing them in a fragile and fanciful coexistence with each other, they create scenes similar to unfiltered dream states.“ ~ Mark Kielkucki

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